Diversity & Inclusion
at GitHub

A letter from our CEO & Co-Founder, Chris Wanstrath

Today I am pleased to share our second annual Diversity Report. While we are working every day internally to make GitHub the most inclusive company it can possibly be, this report represents our commitment to the community to be transparent and accountable for continued progress.

This year, we saw growth across key indices as we welcomed more employees from a wide range of backgrounds into the company. Most specifically, we experienced a 2% growth in each of our Black and Asian communities and doubled our percentage of transgender and genderqueer employees (from 1% to 2%). We are extremely proud of this growth, and it is a result of commitments we made last year—commitments to improving our hiring practices and to our community partners who help keep the pipeline robust. While we are cautiously optimistic about our progress year-over-year, there is still a long way to go toward better representation in our company and in the entire sector.

One interesting data point we examined this year is around retention. As we look at our overall attrition rates, there is no significant difference among gender, race, or ethnicity in terms of who is staying with or leaving the company. This is a metric we will continue to keep an eye on and one that we will use to hold ourselves accountable as we build a more inclusive culture. We encourage other companies to do the same.

There are still places where we have more, concentrated work to do. Specifically, we lost a percentage point in women in leadership. In addition, we would have liked to have seen stronger growth of people of color in leadership roles beyond a 2% gain.

Something I am proud to announce as part of our overall efforts is the creation of an Office of Employee Experience and Engagement, which will be led by Merritt Anderson. This office will be responsible for employee advocacy, diversity and inclusion, learning and development, and overall workplace experience. In her leadership position as a VP, Merritt will sit on the executive team and we will work together to improve the full experience of GitHub employees from recruitment through the end of their tenure. We continue to commit ourselves to improving employee experience for all people from all backgrounds. This builds on the good work of the Social Impact team, a team that has strengthened us as a company over the past two years.

You can toggle through the report below to compare our progress year-over-year. My statement from last year can be found here.

Onward,

Chris Wanstrath, CEO & Co-Founder

Current demographic data

(as of June 2017)

This report is comprised of information that GitHub employees (“Hubbers”) identified for themselves. We are strongly committed to self-identification while remaining cognizant that the standard reporting categories mandated by the U.S. federal government are not as inclusive as they need to be.

Where data is available, we have chosen to share progress made from 12/31/2014 to the present.

Total numbers and geographic distribution

629 Hubbers

38% Based in San Francisco HQ

42% US-based, not in SF

20% International

576 Hubbers

44% Based in San Francisco HQ

35% US-based, not in SF

20% International

Gender (Worldwide)

Gender identity

(as of June, 2017)

37% Women

63% Men

A deeper look at gender at GitHub shows us that 2% of Hubbers identify as transgender or genderqueer. We are proud that this is a growing segment of our company.

Leadership and gender

(as of June, 2017)

34% Women

66% Men

"Leaders" are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

Technical roles and gender

(as of June, 2017)

22% Women

78% Men

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales). This also includes all technical roles in the Product organization. The Support function is not included in this data.

Gender identity

(as of May 23, 2016)

36% Women

64% Men

A deeper look at gender at GitHub shows us that over 1% of Hubbers identify as transgender, genderqueer, or nonbinary. We are proud that this is a growing segment of our company.

Leadership and gender

(as of May 23, 2016)

35% Women

65% Men

"Leaders" are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

Technical roles and gender

(as of May 23, 2016)

22% Women

78% Men

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales). This also includes all technical roles in the Product organization. The Support function is not included in this data.

Gender identity

(2014)

21% Women

79% Men

Race/ethnicity (US only)

All Hubbers

(as of June, 2017)

4% Black or African-American

6% Hispanic or Latino

5% Two or more races/ethnicities

14% Asian

11% Unreported

60% White

Leadership

(as of June, 2017)

2% Black or African-American

5% Hispanic or Latino

8% Two or more races/ethnicities

16% Asian

8% Unreported

61% White

“Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

Technical roles

(as of June, 2017)

5% Black or African-American

5% Hispanic or Latino

3% Two or more races/ethnicities

13% Asian

10% Unreported

64% White

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales). This also includes all technical roles in the Product organization. The Support function is not included in this data.

Women

(as of June, 2017)

5% Black or African-American

8% Hispanic or Latino

7% Two or more races/ethnicities

16% Asian

11% Unreported

53% White

Intersectional data is critical to understanding the growth of our diversity. We will increase the number of axes along which we will report Hubber data in the future. On this first iteration, we have chosen to report data on the intersectionality of race/ethnicity and gender.

All Hubbers

(as of May 23, 2016)

2% Black or African-American

6% Hispanic or Latino

5% Two or more races/ethnicities

12% Asian

11% Unreported

64% White

Leadership

(as of May 23, 2016)

0% Black or African-American

3% Hispanic or Latino

7% Two or more races/ethnicities

17% Asian

10% Unreported

63% White

“Leaders” are defined as anyone who manages others at GitHub.

Technical roles

(as of May 23, 2016)

1% Black or African-American

4% Hispanic or Latino

3% Two or more races/ethnicities

13% Asian

14% Unreported

65% White

Technical roles include everyone in the Engineering organization and Engineers embedded in other areas (e.g. Sales). This also includes all technical roles in the Product organization. The Support function is not included in this data.

Women

(as of May 23, 2016)

4% Black or African-American

7% Hispanic or Latino

7% Two or more races/ethnicities

15% Asian

10% Unreported

57% White

Intersectional data is critical to understanding the growth of our diversity. We will increase the number of axes along which we will report Hubber data in the future. On this first iteration, we have chosen to report data on the intersectionality of race/ethnicity and gender.

All Hubbers

(2014)

<1% Black or African-American

3% Hispanic or Latino

6% Two or more races/ethnicities

6% Asian

17% Unreported

67% White

Age distribution (Worldwide)

% of Total Hubbers

Age range

Due to the current conversation around the lack of age diversity in tech, we have chosen to report and measure this demographic as our baseline and will continue to do so.

Average age: 35

Median age: 33

Parental status (Worldwide)

40%

We are happy to report that 40% of Hubbers self-reported as parents or step-parents. Whether they're newborns or children in their 20s, our “Octokittens” are an important part of life at GitHub. For this reason, we are constantly iterating on the benefits offered to parents/families. In particular, we are proud to have increased our parental leave policy last year from 16 to 20 weeks, exceeding the tech industry's norm. In addition, we also offer a flexible paid time-off policy and our parental leave does not differentiate between maternity or paternity leave, nor biological or adopted children.